Facing Up to the Capitalist Within

As with the social changes that were necessary to end the African slave trade, a transformation of modern capitalism requires that we step outside of ourselves and examine our own roles within the system objectively.
As with the social changes that were necessary to end the African slave trade, a transformation of modern capitalism requires that we step outside of ourselves and examine our own roles within the system objectively.

Georgie Wingfield-Hayes is a therapist who works with a combination of nutrition and other techniques to promote an integrated approach to wellbeing. She is a current post-graduate student at the Institute for Leadership and Sustainability.

In this article, she uses the example of a slave ship captain who became an anti-slavery campaigner to illustrate how the ‘stories’ that drive and reinforce our beliefs can be identified and transformed. She sees the inner beliefs about the inevitability of ‘business-as-usual’ embedded in our culture as similarly open to change. This requires us to re-examine notions that the self is separate from those against whom we strive for success and who cannot be trusted: that debt is the driver of development; that external knowledge is superior to inner knowledge.  She recounts how she liberated herself from her own ‘inner capitalist’ following a course on ‘Sustainable Leadership’ designed to develop critical thinking, deconstruct  perceptions of social norms, reconnect  with the planet, and understand the realities of climate change.

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